David III Kuropalates’ coins with the depiction of cross potent
Type: David III Kuropalates’ coins with the depiction of cross potent

Description, picture:
Silver.

The weight of half drama (?) – 2,1 gr. For miliaresion/drama the weights range from 3,05 to 3,5 gr.
d=22,9 mm. for half drama (?), d≈23/24 mm. for miliaresion/drama.

Obverse: Georgian legend (abbreviation everywhere) – ႵႤႸႤ/ႣႧ “Christ, forgive David”.

Reverse: Cross potent on the four steps and Georgian legend – ႩႮႲႨ “Kurapalati”.

Scholarly commentary:
    “Georgian-Byzantine coins” is the name of a coin group. It consists of the issues as follows: David III Kuropalates’ coins with the depiction of cross potent, St. Virgin Blachernitissa type coins – Bagrat IV’s first and second emissions, Giorgi II’s first, second and third emissions and David IV’s first and second emissions; David IV’s copper coin, type – king in Imperial coat.
    The initiator of the Georgian coinage inspired by Byzantine style was David III Kuropalates, seignior of Imier Tao, a part of historical Southwestern Georgia. Only four specimens are known from this emission. The dating of this issue rests on a precise knowledge of the year in which David was granted the title of Kuropalates. And it is thought that this title was bestowed upon him for his special help to the Emperor Basil in the struggle against mutinous grandees. The army of Bardas Sclerus was annihilated by David’s generals near Halys River. This event took place in 979. The coins of David III are dated to 979, it was in that year that he received the title of Kuropalates and coins bearing that title would have served as a magnificent memorial to that historical event. But still we have a suspicion. Why do these coins copy Imperial silver of 977; maybe David was already Kuropalates while preparing auxiliary for the Emperor. And one more question – there is Patriarchal cross on the supposed prototype. Still another pattern was used also while modelling this coin.
    From the 4 specimens now discussed none of them was found in Georgia. They were discovered far away from there, in Russia, Estonia, Germany and Sweden. How did they find their way to those regions? Two hypotheses exist concerning this item:
    1) typologically these coins are very close to almost synchronous silver pieces of Basil II and Constantine VIII, and they have the same weight and standard. So it was good money and could circulate everywhere together with Byzantine currency. Russian merchants used to come to Constantinople regularly and then they took the silver pieces of David Kuropalates to Europe;
    2) trading contacts between Georgia and Russia must account for the findings of these coins on the territory of Europe, effected via Tmutaracan (modern Taman Peninsula), this view being corroborated by other evidence as well. A rare Tmutaracanian piece was found in Georgia – the imitation of a miliaresion.
    The supposed mint for the coins of Kuropalates is Oltisi, his residence (modern Oltu in Turkey).
    The kings of Georgia – Bagrat IV (1027-1072), Giorgi II (1072-1089) and David IV (1089-1125) – were enjoying St. Virgin Blachernitissa type taken from the coins of Constantine IX  and maintained after.
    The very characteristic trait of the 11th c. Georgian numismatics is an obvious tendency towards weight lightening – a reception of a new standard, the Byzantine 2/3 miliaresion, called tetri (Ar.) took place during the reign of Bagrat IV. This term already figures in the 11th c. documents.
    Now let us describe the material:
    Bagrat IV. I emission. Tetri. The weights range from 1,47 to 2,2 gr. d=23/24-27/28 mm. 1055. Kutaisi (the Western Georgia):

Obverse: Facing bust of Virgin orans, nimbate, wearing pallium and maphorium. Greek legend – Η ΑΓΙΑ ΘΕΟΤΟΚΟC – “the Holy Virgin”, close to nimbus, in different ways.
Reverse: Marginal Georgian legend – ႵႤႠႣႤႡႢႲႠႴႾႦႧႠႫႴႤ – “Christ, exalt Bagrat, the king of the Abkhasians” (i.e. the Western Georgia). In the centre – ႣႠႬႭ/ႥႤႪႨႱႨ/ႫႭႱႨ “and Nobilissimos”.

    Only 12 specimens are known. The dating is based on the king’s Byzantine title and other political traits.
    Now briefly about the mentioned Georgian title – “the king of the Abkhasians”. A country is economic-geographical region. Unique culture is formed within on a basis of the intensive interior economic links. And Georgia is such complex. It was formed by economic synthesis of the East (Iberia) and the West (Colchis), and since the Mingrelian (i.e. the Colchian) language has been transferred to a position of a family-language. A bit earlier the Svanetian and the Abkhasian languages were put on the same position by the Mingrelian language. In the 8th c. new dynasty was founded in Colchis, or Lazica. And this ruling house was from the province of Abkhasia, part of Lazica. Lazica now is called “the Kingdom of Abkhasians”, and the languages spoken here are Mingrelian, first, then – Georgian. And soon after, Georgia – a new economic complex – came to realization, and some times later the country was unified by Bagrationi ruling house. This house also claimed to be “the king of the Abkhasians”, i.e. of the Western Georgia.
    The royal descents left without the special domain in Amier Tao (South-West Georgia) had to strip themselves of the title – “king of Kartvelians” (i.e. Eastern and Southern Georgia). This happened twice with Bagrat IV. In 1055 his rival duke Liparit captured Tao, and in 1068 – Alp Arslan himself. So, the coins with the sole title “king of the Abkhasians” should be dated by 1055 and 1068-1069.
    Bagrat IV. II emission (28 specimens). Tetri. The weights range from 1,2 to 2,23 gr. d=24-27/28 mm. 1068/69. Kutaisi. Everything is the same except of the central legend – here we have “Sebastos” .

Obverse: Facing bust of Virgin orans, nimbate, wearing pallium and maphorium. Greek legend – Η ΑΓΙΑ ΘΕΟΤΟΚΟC – “the Holy Virgin”, close to nimbus, in different ways.
Reverse: Marginal Georgian legend – ႵႤႠႣႤႡႢႲႠႴႾႦႧႠႫႴႤ – “Christ, exalt Bagrat, the king of the Abkhasians” (i.e. the Western Georgia). In the centre – ႣႠႱ/ႤႥႠႱ/ႲႭႱႨ  “and Sebastos”.

    The extant specimens of Giorgi II, some 100 pieces, can be divided into three emissions, taking into account the alterations of Byzantine title.
    Giorgi II. I emission. Tetri /debased/. The weights range from 1,1 to 2,15 gr. d=21/26-27/29 mm. 1073.  Kutaisi.

Obverse: Facing bust of Virgin orans, nimbate, wearing pallium and maphorium. Distorted Greek abbreviation for – Η ΑΓΙΑ ΘΕΟΤΟΚΟC – “the Holy Virgin”, to l. and r. from nimbus. Greek legend –  ΜΡ ΘΥ – appears sometime.
Reverse: Marginal Georgian legend –  ႵႤႠႣႤႢႨႠႴႾႦႧႠႣႠႵႰႧႥႪႧႠႫႴႤ – “Christ, exalt Giorgi, the king of the Abkhasians and the Kartvelians” (i.e. the Eastern and Southern Georgia). In the centre –  ႣႠ/ႬႪႱႨ/ႫႱႨ – “and Nobilissimos”.

    Giorgi as a prince already possessed the title of Kuropalates. Towards the end of 1072 he became king receiving gradually the titles of Nobilissimos and Sebastos. In 1074 Giorgi as Caesaros was put in charge of the Imperial Eastern limits. So, the issues with the titles of Nobilissimos and Sebastos fit 1073-1074.
    II and III emissions have “Sebastos” and “Caesaros” instead. And Greek legend –  ΜΡ ΘΥ Η ΒΛΑΧΕΡΝΙΤΙCΑ (St. Virgin Blachernitissa) – appears also sometime.
    Giorgi II. II emission. Tetri. The weights range approx. from 1,21 to 2,03 gr.  d≈24/25-27,2/27,8 mm. 1074. Kutaisi.

Obverse: Facing bust of Virgin orans, nimbate, wearing pallium and maphorium. Distorted Greek abbreviation for – Η ΑΓΙΑ ΘΕΟΤΟΚΟC – “the Holy Virgin”, to l. and r. from nimbus. Some specimens have different legend – ΜΡ ΘΥ Η ΒΛΑΧΕΡΝΙΤΙCΑ – “St. Virgin Blachernitissa”.
Reverse: Marginal Georgian legend – ႵႤႠႣႤႢႨႠႴႾႦႧႠႣႠႵႰႧႥႪႧႠႫႴႤ – “Christ, exalt Giorgi, the king of the Abkhasians and the Kartvelians”. In the centre – ႣႠ/ႱႤႥႱ/ႲႭႱႨ – “and Sebastos”.

    Giorgi II. III emission. Tetri and half tetri. The weights range for half tetri approx. from 0,43 to 0,99 gr., the weights range for tetri approx. from 1,01 (?) to 1,94 gr. d≈20/22-25/26 mm. for half tetri,  d≈22/25-26/7 mm. for tetri. 1075-1089. Kutaisi.

Obverse: Facing bust of Virgin orans, nimbate, wearing pallium and maphorium. Distorted Greek abbreviation for – Η ΑΓΙΑ ΘΕΟΤΟΚΟC – “the Holy Virgin”, to l. and r. from nimbus. Some specimens have different legend – ΜΡ ΘΥ Η ΒΛΑΧΕΡΝΙΤΙCΑ – “St. Virgin Blachernitissa”.
Reverse: Marginal Georgian legend – ႵႤႠႣႤႢႨႠႴႾႦႧႠႣႠႵႰႧႥႪႧႠႫႴႤ – “Christ, exalt Giorgi, the king of the Abkhasians and the Kartvelians”. In the centre – ႣႠ/ႩႤႱႠ/ႰႭႱႨ “and Caesaros”.

    Within the 8 pieces of David IV three emissions can be identified.
    David IV. I emission. Half tetri. The weights range from 0,43 to 0,73 gr. d=22/23-25/26 mm. 1089-1099. Kutaisi.

Obverse: Facing bust of Virgin orans, nimbate, wearing pallium and maphorium. Greek legend – ΜΡ – ΘΥ, to l. and r. from nimbus.
Reverse: Marginal Georgian legend – ...ႤႣႧႠႴႾ... “Christ, exalt David, the king of the Abkhasians”. In the centre – ႣႠ/ႱႤႥႱ/ႲႱ “and Sebastos”.

    And the second emission has the cross on Rev. while St. Virgin is maintained. II emission. Half tetri. The weights range from 0,56 to 0,87 gr. d=23/24-26/28 mm. 1089-1099. Kutaisi.

Obverse: Facing bust of Virgin orans, nimbate, wearing pallium and maphorium. Greek legend ΜΡ – ΘΥ, to l. and r. from nimbus.
Reverse: Cross in the center and marginal Georgian legend –  ႵႤႠႣႣႧႫႴႤႣႠ... – “Christ, exalt David, the king and Sebastos (?)”.

    Georgia never wished to lose strong neighbour and partner with whom she shared even the money types – universal Orthodox symbols prevail, like cross potent, St. Virgin Blachernitissa etc.

St.Virgin Blachernitissa.
The Byzantine Case
 St.Virgin Blachernitissa.
The Georgian Case
 1. Constantine IX Monomachus (1042-1055) – 2/3 miliaresion  1. Bagrat IV. I emission. Tetri (2/3 miliaresion).
1055. Kutaisi (West Georgia) “... king and Nobilissimos”
 2. Theodora (1055-1056)
– 2/3 miliaresion
 2. Bagrat IV. II emission. Tetri. 1068/69. Kutaisi. “... king and Sebastos”
 3. Michael VI Stratioticus (1056-1057) – 2/3 miliaresion
 3. Giorgi II. I emission. Tetri. 1073. Kutaisi. “... king and Nobilissimos”
 4. Constantine X Ducas (1059-1067) – 1/3 miliaresion 4. Giorgi II. II emission. Tetri. 1074. Kutaisi. “... king and Sebastos”
 5. Romanus IV Diogenes (1068-1071) – 1/3 miliaresion 5. Giorgi II. III emission. Tetri and half tetri (1/3miliaresion). 1075-1089. Kutaisi. “... king and Caesaros”
 6. Michael VII Ducas (1071-1078) – 1/3 miliaresion 6. David IV. I emission. Half tetri. 1089-1099. Kutaisi. “... king and Sebastos”
 7. Nicephorus III Botaneiates
– 2/3 miliaresion (1078-1081)
 7. David IV. II emission. Kutaisi. 1089-1099. “... king and ... ”. Cross on Rev.
 8. Alexios I Comnenos (1081-1118) – tetarteron 

    It is quite clear that for Georgia Virgin type had been rather taken again and again, than – maintained. David IV of Georgia (1089-1125) copies Alexios I in his issues. But whom he copies while placing cross on reverse?  Theodoros Gabras, dux of Trebizond, appears with his coins as a prototype; i.e. any of the Byzantine “rudiments” seems to be allied with Georgia.
    David gained almost full control over the country only about 1099, and before he had been just “king of the Abkhasians”. First two issues show the king in this troubled position. Thus St. Virgin Blachernitissa series came to an end.
    David IV. III emission. Follis. Weight – 10,73 gr. d=35 mm. 1118-1125. Kutaisi.

Obverse: Bust of a king in Imperial coat – wearing stemma (Imperial crown with cross and the pendants, pendilia, πρεπενδούλια), divitision and chlamys; holds in right hand scepter cruciger, and in left, globus cruciger. And Georgian legend –  ႣႧ ႫႴ – “king David”.
Reverse: Cross in a centre and marginal Georgian legend – ႵႣႧႫႴႤႠႴႧႵႰႬႩႾႧႱႾႧ – “Christ, David the king of the Abkhasians, Kartvelians, Ranians, Kakhetians, Armenians” (Rani and Kakheti are very Eastern provinces of Georgia).

    The obverse type of this coin is patterned on the reverse of the post-reform aspron trachy (billon) of Alexios I Comnenos. But the Imperial coat of the Georgian king is not a fiction.
    David is “king of Armenians” from 1118, so his follis was struck between 1118-1125.
Mint: Oltisi.
Nominal: Half drama (?), miliaresion/drama.
Date: 979.
Collection: Berlin Museum – 1 sample, Hermitage – 1 sample, Staatliches Museum Schwerin – 1 sample.
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Imported coins found in Georgia:


11th-12th cc. Byzantine coins from Georgia

East Georgia

1. 4 copper coins of Basil II and Constantine VIII (976-1025) were found during the archaeological excavations in 1936 in Dmanisi.
2. Copper coin of the same Emperors was found in 1937 in Ude village (Adigeni district).
3. Copper coin of the same Emperors was found near Paravani village.
4. Copper coin of the same Emperors was found in 1940s in Noste village (Kaspi district).
5. Copper coin of the same Emperors was found in 1948 during the archaeological excavations near Gandza Gate (historical place in Tbilisi).
6. Identical copper coin was found in Okami (Akhalkalaki district).
7. Identical coin was found in Abavreti (Akhalkalaki district).
8. Copper coin of the same Emperors was found in 1960 in Bakuriani (Borjomi district).
9. There were 5 gold coins of Constantine VIII (1025-1028) in the hoard found in 1906 near Akhaltsikhe.
10. Hoard of Byzantine gold coins placed in a pot was found in the 1930s in Dviri village (Borjomi district). All the coins except for one belonged to the following three Byzantine Emperors: Constantine VIII, Constantine X Ducas (1059-1067), and Romanus IV Diogenes (1067-1071). 22 coins belonging to Constantine VIII are of normal shape. 23 coins are scyphate and belong to Ducas and Romanus IV Diogenes: 22 – to Constantine X Ducas, 1 – to Romanus IV Diogenes. Presumably, the hoard was buried in the 70-80s of the 11th c.
11. Copper coin of Romanus III (1028-1034) was found in 1936 in Dmanisi during archaeological excavations.
12. 6 copper coins of Michael IV (1034-1041) were found in Dmanisi.
13. Copper coin of Constantine IX (1042-1055) was found in the same place.
14. Gold coin of Constantine IX was accidentally  found in 1956 in Avchala, Tbilisi.
15. Copper coin of Theodora (1055-1056) was found in 1911/12 in Tbilisi (Avlabari).
16. 2 copper coins of Theodora were found in the 1920s near Tskordza village (Akhaltsikhe district).
17. Copper coin of Theodora was found in 1936 in Tsintskaro village (Tetritskaro district).
18. 3 copper coins of Theodora were found in 1936 in Dmanisi during archaeological excavations.
19. 2 copper coins of Michael VI (1056-1057) were found in Dmanisi.
20. Constantine X’s copper coin was found in 1925 in Tbilisi during the works at Leselidze street.
21. Copper coin of Constantine X was found in 1926 near Tbilisi.
22. Identical coin was found in 1926 in Dzveli Dmanisi village.
23. 5 copper coins of Constantine X were found in 1936 in Dmanisi during archaeological excavations.
24. Copper coin of Constantine X was found in 1948 near 300 Aragveli Garden, Tbilisi.
25. Copper coin of the same Emperor was found in Ugudeti village (Tetritskaro district) in the 1950s.
26. Copper coin of Constantine X was found in 1952 near Ikalto village.
27. Nomisma of the same Emperor was found in 1953 in Telavi.
28. Nomisma of the same Emperor was found in 1956 in Tsalka district during construction of Khrami power station.
29. Gold coin of Constantine X was found in 1957 near the Tbilisi Sea (water reservoir).
30. Hoard of Byzantine money was found in 1962 in Idumala village (Aspindza district). The hoard contained one gold and 12 electrum coins. The gold coin belongs to Constantine X and, as T. Abramishvili asserts, can be “Constantinati”, whereas the rest of the coins were struck in the name of Nicephorus III (1078-1081) and are “Botaniati”. According to T. Abramishvili, the hoard was probably buried in response to the Seljuk invasion of 1080-1090.
31. Gold coin of Constantine X was found in 1962 in Patara Dmanisi village.
32. Gold coin of Constantine X was found in 1962 near Dmanisi on Zurtaket-Gomareti Plateau.
33. Gold coin of Constantine X was found in 1965 in Rustavi during archaeological excavations.
34. Copper coin of Romanus IV was found in 1936 in Dmanisi.
35. Copper coin of Michael VII (1071-1078) was found in 1936 in Dmanisi during archaeological excavations.
36. Gold coin of Nicephorus III (1078-1081) was found in 1873-1875 near Sapara Monastery (Akhaltsikhe district).
37. Hoard of Nicephorus III’s scyphate silver coins was found near Sapara Monastery in 1890. The exact number of the coins is unknown.
38. Nicephorus III’s electrum coin was found in 1930s near Tetritskaro.
39. 11 electrum coins were found in 1936 in Natkora, between the villages Vardisubani (Telavi district) and Gulgula. One coin, kept at Telavi Historical Museum, belongs to Nicephorus III.
40. Copper coin of Alexios I (1081-1118) was found in 1962 near Shio mgvime Monastery, not far away from Mtskheta.
41. Copper coin of Alexios I was found in 1935 in Krtsanisi.
42. Identical coin was found in 1936 in Dmanisi during archaeological excavations.
43. 2 copper coins of Alexios I were found in 1948 in Tbilisi near the Ganja Gate during archaeological excavations.
44. Hoard of Byzantine gold coins was found in 1949 near Gurjaani during construction of Alazani irrigation channel. Only 7 pieces are existant: 6 – of Alexios I; 1 – of John II (1118-1143).
45. Gold coin of John II was found in 1929 near Shibliani village (Sagarejo district).
46. Gold coin of John II was found in 1953 in Khodasheni village (Telavi district).
47. Identical coin was found in Makharadze village (Gurjaani district).
48. Anonymous 11th c. Byzantine coin was found in 1938 in Tbilisi.
49. Two identical coins were found in 1941-1943 near Dmanisi.
50. Two identical coins were found in 1952 in Okami village (Akhalkalaki district).
51. Anonymous Byzantine copper coin of the 11th c. was found in 1953 near Tmogvi fortress (Aspindza district).
52. 10th-11th cc. Byzantine copper coin was found during construction of Ortachala power station, Tbilisi.
53. 11th c. Byzantine gold coin was found in 1954 in the same place.
54. 11th c. Byzantine copper coin was found in 1953 near Akhalkalaki old fortress.

Thus, within East Georgia there have been found more than 150 11th-12th cc. Byzantine coins: gold – 72; electrum – 24; copper – 52. From the total number, there are 5 hoards of gold, silver, and electrum coins.
Very interesting is distribution of the 11th-12th cc. Byzantine coins according to centuries. 11 out of approximately 150 pieces belong to Alexios I (1081-1118), in other words, to the transitional period, whereas there are only 4 coins from the 12th c. belonging to John II (1118-1143). To conclude: 11th c. Byzantine coins were widely in use in East Georgia. In the 12th c. influx of the Byzantine coins  nearly stops.

West Georgia:

1. Found in 1903 Ochamchire hoard contained 7 copper coins of Basil II and Constantine VIII (976-1025).
2. 2 copper coins struck in the name of the same Emperors were found in 1956 in Bobokvati (Kobuleti district).
3. Identical coin was found in 1957 in Akhali Atoni (Gudauta district).
4. 2 folles of the same Emperors were found in 1957 in Sokhumi (near lighthouse).
5. Copper coin of the same Emperors was found in 1958 in Tsebelda (Gulripshi district).
6. Identical coin was found in 1962 in Kobuleti.
7. Two identical coins were found in 1962-1963 in Bobokvati.
8. 6 copper coins (2 of them belong to Constantine VIII) were found in 1949 in Tsikhisdziri (Kobuleti district).
9. 4 copper coins of Romanus III (1028-1034) were in Ochamchire hoard.
10. Copper coin of Romanus III was found in 1948 in Likhni village (Gudauta district).
11. Identical coin was found in 1962 in  Kobuleti.
12. There were 4 coins of Michael IV (1034-1041) in Ochamchire hoard.
13. 2 identical coins were found in 1910-1911 in Gelati.
14. Identical coin was found in 1929 in Sakara village (Zestaponi district).
15. Identical coin was found in 1957 in Kveda Vani village (Vani district).
16. 2 copper coins of Ochamchire hoard belong to Constantine IX (1042-1055).
17. Silver coin of Constantine IX was found in 1957 in Akhali Atoni.
18. 11 copper coins of Ochamchire hoard belong to Theodora (1055-1056).
19. Identical coins (exact number is unknown) were found in 1910-1911 in Gelati.
20. 2 identical coins were found in 1956 and 1962-1963 in Bobokvati.
21. 5 copper coins of Ochamchire hoard belong to Constantine X (1059-1067).
22. 2 identical coins were found in 1950 in Tsikhisdziri.
23. Identical coin was found in 1962 near Kobuleti.
24. Hoard of copper coins was found in 1968 in Abanoeti village (Ambrolauri district). The hoard consisted of: 2 folles of Basil II and Costantine VIII; 1 – of Michael IV; 2 – of Theodora; 2 – of Constantine X. Also, there were 3 coins of the Latin Empire and 1 – unidentified.
25. Copper coin of Constantine X and his wife Eudocia was found in Odishi village (Zugdidi district).
26. Follis of Romanus IV (1067-1071) was found in the same place.
27. Hoard of  Georgian silver and scyphate Byzantine gold coins was found in a clay pot in 1983 in Likhni village while excavating Medieval palace. The Byzantine coins are struck in the name of: Constantine IX Monomachus – 1; Constantine X – 9; his wife Eudocia – 1; Romanus IV –17; 28 – altogether. 43 coins are of Georgian provenance: 31 belong to Bagrat IV (1027-1072); 12 – to Giorgi II (1072-1089).
28. Gold coin of Michael VII (1071-1078) was found in 1951 on Sokhumi Mountain.
29. Identical coin was found in 1959 in Tsikhisdziri.
30. Copper coin of Nicephorus III (1078-1081) was in Ochamchire hoard.
31. Electrum coin of Nicephorus III was found in 1925 in Chkhari village (Terjola district).
32. Identical coin was found in 1925 in Meskheti village (Kutaisi district).
33. Identical coin was found in 1926 in Racha.
34. Identical coin was found in 1926 near Kutaisi.
35. Identical coin was found in 1933 in Gubi village (Khoni district).
36. Identical coin was found in 1951 on Sokhumi Mountain.
37. 5 identical coins were found in 1956 in Bichvinta during archaeological excavations.
38. Hoard of copper coins was found in 1955 in Sokhumi. The classification is as follows: 2 folles of Michael IV; 5 – of Constantine IX; 3 – of Constantine X; 10 – anonymous (1075-1080).
39. 11th c. Byzantine scyphate gold coin was found in 1901 in Racha.
40. Several 11th-12th cc. Byzantine copper coins were found in 1904 in Keda village (Kedi district).
41. 11th c. Byzantine scyphate gold coin was found in 1905 near Ozurgeti.
42. Electrum of Nicephorus III was found in 1969 near Sinope (Sokhumi).
43. Several Byzantine copper coins with four-line inscription were found in 1910-1911 in Gelati, near Kutaisi.
44. Identical coin was found in 1934 in Tsikhisdziri.
45. 11th-12th cc. Byzantine copper coin with four-line inscription was found in 1935 near Bagrati Cathedral in Kutaisi.
46. Identical coin was found in 1939 in Kutaisi, near railway bridge.
47. 11th c. Byzantine copper coin was found in 1948 in Tsikhisdziri.
48. Identical coin was found in 1949 in Tsikhisdziri.

Thus, there have been found approximately 145 11th-12th cc. Byzantine coins in West Georgia:  copper – about 100;  gold  – 32; electrum –12;  silver – 1. From the total number, there are 3 hoards: 2 – of copper money; 1 – mixed, of gold and silver.
The above-given coins found on the territory of the West Georgia are dated by the 11th c. 12th c. coins have not yet been reported.